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Confidence, Acceptance, Understanding


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    Ivonne
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 437
    Location : California
    Humor : If God is watching us. The least we can do is be entertaining.
    Registration date : 2009-02-08

    Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  Ivonne on Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:05 am

    If you've already bought a horse what did you learn from your experience? Tell us about the good, the bad, the ugly.

    There's always someone out there looking for a horse. It's an investment in time, money and personal devotion (do you and your horse really get along? why?)

    I always recall a class on horse management a long time ago, where the vet in charge started talking about how Arabs used to (or still do) buy horses.

    They stick the horse in a tent and the buyer is outside of the tent, as if waiting for the curtain to raise and the show to begin.

    The seller will raise the curtain to show the feet.

    If the buyer sees sound feet, then he asks the seller to raise the curtain up a little further to show the legs, the knees, a little higher and up to the shoulders and chest, and so on..

    Until the whole horse is uncovered.

    At any time, if the buyer is not satisfied with the conformation of the horse, he tells the seller to stop and the curtain isn't raised any higher and the deal is off.

    So, if the buyer sees a horse that has weak feet, then no deal, or if the horse is pigeon-toed or.... anything that seems "off" to the buyer = the curtain isn't raised any further.

    Point is....Too many times the buyer looks at the horse like they're buying a dog. He's so cute! She's so flashy! Then get the horse home only to find out: she's lame, he's not as well trained as the seller claimed, he's got some kind of issue with his hip, or neck, or she's a rough ride, or...

    the key points when buying a horse:

    Soundness?
    Conformation? (how well built is the horse? if he's "off" somewhere, he might go lame easily, or might get sore easily or might get a sway back easily, or .....)

    Then there's the question of training.

    How well trained do you need the horse to be? A true kid broke horse? That if you are screaming and peeing in your pants, the horse isn't going to react? Or can you handle a horse that knows nothing or next to nothing? How well trained are you? Do you really know how to ride? Are you just learning to ride? Are you an expert/confident rider? Can you deal and fix negative issues? Will you both need some training? Got the money for that, too?

    I always tell people in the market:

    1. go see the horse and watch the owner catch, groom, tack up, ride (at ALL GAITS)
    2. then do the same yourself
    3. get a vet check
    4. find someone who knows what to look for, someone who isn't going to "fall in love" with the horse, but who can give you an honest opinion

    What about if you're selling a horse? What do you look for in a buyer?

    What's your input?
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    Rodger
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 77
    Registration date : 2009-02-09

    Re: Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  Rodger on Tue Feb 17, 2009 3:17 am

    My advice, make sure you can catch it.
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    Shadowfax
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 287
    Registration date : 2009-02-15

    Re: Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  Shadowfax on Tue Feb 17, 2009 11:26 am

    ROTFL Rodger!

    Also make the owner ride it first. But make them let you handle and tack the horse.

    Take a farrier or trimmer with you if you don't know feet
    take a trainer with you if your inexperienced.
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    Rocky Red
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 96
    Age : 58
    Location : Indiana
    Registration date : 2009-02-10

    Re: Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  Rocky Red on Wed Feb 18, 2009 2:35 am

    I always like to do a test ride away from the horses comfort zone, preferably alone. For example, if they offer to let me ride in a round pen I would take the horse outside of the round pen and ride around the pasture/yard away from the barn and see how they react. One of the best trail horses I ever had was one that the owners offered and indeed did trailer him 3 hours to meet me at a state forest for a day long trail ride. Needless to say he was sold by the time we made it back Hi there
    I realize that kind of test ride is not always possible. Being able to get them on a trial basis helps, as well.
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    Hasufel
    Colt

    Number of posts : 22
    Location : BlackandGold, PA
    Registration date : 2009-02-16

    Re: Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  Hasufel on Wed Feb 18, 2009 4:31 am

    once you find the 'perfect' horse, go look at 5 more just to be sure.
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    Ivonne
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 437
    Location : California
    Humor : If God is watching us. The least we can do is be entertaining.
    Registration date : 2009-02-08

    Re: Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  Ivonne on Fri Feb 20, 2009 9:16 am

    Rodger wrote:My advice, make sure you can catch it.
    hehehe Good one!

    Don't just get to where the horse is and acccept seeing the horse already saddled and ready to go!ridin
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    wjm in wi
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 191
    Location : SW WI
    Humor : clean and dry
    Registration date : 2009-02-12

    Re: Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  wjm in wi on Thu Feb 26, 2009 7:21 am

    This worked so well for us, I just thought I'd share it...
    we went to look at the horse, with no intention to ride, but watched the owner interact and ride him.
    Then we left and thought/talked about what we saw.
    We then emailed the owner and set up another time to come and actually ride him.
    After setting up the time, we made a list of what we wanted to accomplish at the second look, and I then emailed those expectations to the owner, so we would be on the same page as to what we wanted to do. I also promised her we'd keep it to two hours max, so that she wouldn't have to worry we'd be there forever trying him out!
    We ended up getting in everything we wanted to do almost exactly in the two hour time slot we had "reserved" to see him.
    We then went home/talked/thought some more, and worked out a trial via emailing. We asked for 2-3 days...she gave us a week!
    We did a lot of communicating, and I think that is a key thing in getting a good trying/buying experience!!!
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    Clueless in Cali
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 71
    Location : Hollister, CA
    Humor : sarcasm x eleventy billion
    Registration date : 2009-02-08

    Re: Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  Clueless in Cali on Sat Apr 18, 2009 12:04 pm

    Some people at my barn got a 2 year old filly about 7 months ago. My BO had noticed something going on with this little filly. Well, don't you know, she's preggers! Apparently, she was sold bred and didn't tell the buyers. Now they're gonna have 2 babies... EEEK Holy Crap! They are so upset because they were just starting her under saddle and now she'll have to have time off to foal. ugh

    A preg check is probably not something you would routinely do, but it might be wise to ask if a filly/mare has been around any stallions...
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    Ivonne
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 437
    Location : California
    Humor : If God is watching us. The least we can do is be entertaining.
    Registration date : 2009-02-08

    Re: Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  Ivonne on Sat Apr 18, 2009 12:31 pm

    Know what I heard though....from people who also got surprised....was that after a certain time or something....it's near impossible to tell and it's just "wait and see" type of deal. I dunno if that's 100% true. But it sure sounds like it.
    Anyone know more about that? Can you at any time check to see if the mare is pregs?
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    horselovin'gal
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 120
    Registration date : 2009-02-12

    Re: Please Add your Input to the List

    Post  horselovin'gal on Sun Apr 19, 2009 4:13 am

    I remember that when we had a mare bred, the breeder would 'teez' her to see if she was bred back or not. If she was open-no foal within, she would be very receptive to the stud, and if she was PG, she would make it very clear that she was in foal--wanting NOTHING to do with him. I'm wondering if that's the case in all the months of the PG?
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    horselovin'gal
    Mustang

    Number of posts : 120
    Registration date : 2009-02-12

    purchasing question??

    Post  horselovin'gal on Mon Apr 20, 2009 3:29 am

    So, as it's spring, and lots of horses change hands at this time of year (no, I'm not looking currently, it's just raining:)), a question about snaffle bits, versus the seller's choice of bits....snaffle or harsher....

    I'm assuming most of you have your horses in snaffle bits, (correct me if I'm wrong), and so many other horse owners DO NOT.

    When your riding turn comes up-at the 'visit to see a purchase horse', after the owner's ride, I'm assuming that you ride in the bit that the horse is used to/already tacked up in. Do you explore the hp over, ORS, hss, etc. during your ride in this harsher bit? Is this hard on the horse-I'm assuming yes?

    Do you ride in the owner's bit, and then ask if you could try 'your' bit and headstall? (maybe this one comes only during the at home trial or the trail ride, or ride #2, or #3, or more, etc.

    OR... do you all make the dicisions to buy or not to buy, based solely on the bit the horse is currently working in, and then change to snaffle in the first months after purchase? YAY for purchases-BTW!

    OR.... do you, purchase, change and train in snaffle, and then change to something else you 'personally' prefer to work in?

    This JL snaffle philosophy (which I am LOVING learning, BTW), is not supported at all in the area where I live,...by anyone of my horse friends accept one, (and definately not in any of the drill team/show/trail riding friends--they're all rolled into one), so I'm trying to clarify. Because I don't have enough control of my horse in this learning yet, I'm not really confident riding with them yet--bummer! The trainer friend that I have is totally old school, and harsher bit for contol stuff, she went with me to see JL work, and didn't agree with it, that's fine.

    Thanks tons....for any answers! Always learning!!!

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